Carson Lueders feat Jordyn Jones "TAKE OVER" Music Video Review

Carson Lueders and Jordyn Jones on the set of "Take Over." Photo courtesy of Nayip Ramos. 

Carson Lueders and Jordyn Jones on the set of "Take Over." Photo courtesy of Nayip Ramos. 

On Dec. 9, 2014, YouTube teen singing sensationCarson Lueders, released his latest music video, “Take Over.”  Lueders, who is repped by Johnny Wright (CEO Wright Entertainment Group also repping Justin Timberlake, Akon and many others), single-handedly delivers a performance similar to the likes of One Direction.  His fans respond in kind to his performance.  “Take Over” also features the rapping prowess of Jordyn Jones, another teen music artist on the rise.  Fans first took notice of Jones on the Lifetime’s “Abby’s Ultimate Dance Competition.”  

Jordyn Jones and dance crew on the set of "Take Over" music video. Photo courtesy of Nayip Ramos.

Jordyn Jones and dance crew on the set of "Take Over" music video. Photo courtesy of Nayip Ramos.

Lyrically, “Take Over” contains the theme of young love, friendship and taking over; yet still tween-friendly.  The way "You and me girl, we’re takin’ over" massive chorus bobs along with a tight enhancement of Jones’ rapping harmonies distinguishes the song from Lueders’ other massively popular tracks. When Lueders hits the "oh oh oh" and "woahoah" parts, you're in bubblegum pop bliss.  Production-wise, its sound is firmly rooted in modern pop, though this is still a song that is tween friendly while still courting a teenage crowd. It is one both Lueders’ and Jones’ fans should appreciate.  It opens with Jones rapping the introduction of taking over the circus; leads into a peppy pre-chorus and up-tempo energy, culminating with sounds ready to create a dance frenzy in middle school gyms. The video contains infectious dance choreography as Lueders and Jones lead background dancersthrough a skittering hip-pop, rhythmic bobbing routine. The friendship aspect between Lueders and Jones is evident. It is so easy to make the entire video about young love and romance, but the scene of them back-to-back on the spinning wheel and then smiling at each other gives the story a whole new element of friendship.

Carson Lueders and dance crew on the set of "Take Over." Photo courtesy of Nayip Ramos. 

Carson Lueders and dance crew on the set of "Take Over." Photo courtesy of Nayip Ramos. 

The song is produced by Andrew Lane who boasts a long list of A-list music clients including Backstreet Boys, Irene Cara, and Kelly Rowland and Michelle Williams of Destiny’s Child as well as songs for High School Musical and Hannah Montana.  Lane commented, “Working with Carson has been an amazing experience and to watch his music manifest itself to the highest level with this video is the ultimate compliment. I've been working with Carson for about three years now; I watched him grow and grow and develop into one of the most promising future superstars in the business. This is only the beginning.”  

It comes as no surprise that this video is a homerun for Lueders; it was directed by Nayip Ramos5840 Productions, whose creative vision contributes to elevating music videos to viral hits. Lueders and Ramos have worked together on Lueders’ previous music video “Beautiful.”  Ramos knows how to make spectacle-driven music videos for music artist looking to make a lasting impact. Some of his other work includes Jones’ cover video “Banji,” garnering almost 5 million views in 7 months and “Fancy,” racking up another 3 million views to her channel in 6 months. 

Ramos shared that it took two days just to build the circus-like set for the video shot on location in the desert outside of Los Angeles.  It was shot during the summer of 2014 and was 110 degrees.  The circus set pieces were also used in feature film “American Horror Story.”  It was so intricate and detailed that the crew was there for 16-18 hours building and tearing down the sets. 

A story is only as interesting as the editing allows, and this video definitely makes for a good story. The colors give it such a dramatic, movie feel. The reds and blues reflect the moods of each scene.  The props and circus set is epic.  Classic circus fare feel brings a component of innocence and fun; that feeling of being care-free at the summer carnival.  Having the story culminate at night is a really nice touch.

Directed by: Nayip Ramos | Produced by: Evan Kaufmann | choreography by: Tricia Miranda | Shot by: Cameron Schmucker | edited by: Evan Kaufmann | colorist: Gavin Fisher | track produced and written by: Andrew Lane and Mariah Parks | Mixed by Josh Smith.

For more information about Carson Lueders, visit his Official Website